Fourteen TC-920 irons aim to fix ‘poor balance between the woods and irons’

Equipment

The new Fourteen TC-920 irons make a statement that the modern golf swing requires a change in the way modern clubs, particularly modern irons, should be designed.

According to Fourteen’s Masashi Kamoda, the dynamics of the swing have changed to better align with how the modern driver has been designed with a lower center of gravity for higher launching, lower spinning shots. “There is now a gap in the club specifications in the center of gravity with players irons,” Kamoda said. “They have largely remained unchanged, and the result is a poor balance between the woods and irons.”

The alternative in the new Fourteen TC-920 irons is a forged cavity back design aimed at producing distance through a low CG design for maximizing distance. “This club has been designed to bridge this gap and achieve closer CG specifications to our modern day driver heads, and is matched to achieve overall balance and delivery in the golf swing,” Kamoda said, noting that the TC-920 doesn’t rely on a hollow head construction to boost distance and launch. Instead, Kamoda said the deep undercut cavity on the TC920 aims “to match the similar ball speed feeling as the driver … and control a high launching ball with the longer irons and distance with the shorter irons.”

“A balanced connection among all 14 clubs is essential,” he said.

The TC-920 irons are forged from S25C mild carbon steel and feature a compact size with fairly traditional lofts. That includes a 46-degree pitching wedge and a 33-degree 7-iron. (By comparison, the average 7-iron loft for players irons on the 2019 Golf Digest Hot List also is 33 degrees.) To optimize trajectory for each iron, the CG location is tweaked by selectively thinning or thickening sections of the cavity. The head features minimal offset.

The Fourteen TC-920 irons are offered in 3-iron through pitching wedge with a Nippon NS Pro Modus3 Tour 105 steel shaft and the True Temper Dynamic Gold S200 as standard options ($210 per club).

Products You May Like

Articles You May Like

Ireland’s James Sugrue wins Amateur Championship at home as Portmarnock plays rare host
Tips from a new coach (yep, another one) and a fresh putting perspective help Lydia Ko gain confidence
Beneath Tommy Fleetwood’s fun-loving exterior is a competitor who wants more
A different style of play is necessary to win the KPMG Women’s PGA Championship
13 (more) of the dumbest things in golf

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *